pardon our dust
pardon our dust
pardon our dust

This is a challenging time to be a small business owner. While soap is technically essential (and there’s still a handful of styles available to ship), I completely understand that the particular designs and ingredients I embrace for sustainable justification are becoming less accessible financially to many people, and that just doesn’t sit well with my triple bottom line. 10 years of business doesn’t matter if there are more important things to address. I am not planning to resume manufacturing at the volume I had previously procured for hundreds of independent stores around the country.

Lately, I’ve been feeling more connected to my roots in advocacy, which combines stewardship and outreach for more equitable open space experiences, through sustainable land management practices and art practice. Since graduating college, I never stopped taking classes and volunteering in public parks. As I have picked up momentum the last few years, I have begun compiling resources in natural resource committees, artist residencies, accreditation programs and more specialized botanical illustration courses. At this segue, I am gathering my tools to develop a body of work that will connect people with environmental stewardship roles to honor native habitat.

While the photo above shows a trail splitting with two options, there are likely many more options to consider which will reveal themselves as time goes on. So, I’m doing the best I can to become more educated in order to make the best decision for my next step. It’s moving slower than I would have expected, but I am finding the extra time to invest in fortifying my support network. Since I think sometimes folks (including myself) forget, there are humans behind each and every marketed product and process. It’s not a mindless factory line, and I want it to stay that way. And I’m going to take the time I need to do it to my standards, however long that takes. Hence, no E.T.A..

Lastly, “we” is mostly me; I am the only employee of this operation – doing 100% of the manufacturing, purchasing, bookkeeping, marketing, and sales – although I have often relied on paid contractors to fill in gaps where I can not as a one-woman show. It is my intention to honor the craft of many whom have supported my goals when I say “we”.